We're looking for a few good Controls and DevOps people! The Legged Robot Controls Algorithm Developer will be working full time with the robotics team on various bipedal and quadrupedal robots, including the Boston Dynamics Atlas and the NASA JSC Valkyrie. The DevOps Engineer will be bringing our lab up to speed on how to best use modern solutions for making our software development and release process super repeatable, reliable, and painless.

IHMC is an awesome place to work, with a relaxed dress code, flexible schedules, and a collaborative work environment. The lab likes to keep the vibe happy, with Learning Lunches, dress up dares, group river tubing trips, field trips to local attractions like Pensacola Bay Brewery, and paintball days. Plus, IHMC offers an amazing benefits package.

Pensacola is a great place to live! The weather is (almost) always perfect for outdoor activities like sailing on the bay, volleyball on the white sand beaches, kayaking on Blackwater River, or camping right by the waves. The lab is located in Downtown Pensacola, surrounded by tasty restaurants, art museums, concert venues, farmers markets, and food trucks. Pensacola thrives on never-ending music, dining, dancing and cultural diversity located right at your fingertips. You'll love it here!

Check out the job openings on the Jobs page to see if you're a good fit!

Posted
AuthorBrooke Layton

Three years of almost non-stop work paid off Saturday when the Institute for Human and Machine Cognition placed second in a $3.5 million global robotics competition held in Pomona, Calif.

Team IHMC’s semi-autonomous robot, nicknamed “Running Man,” on Saturday bested 21 other teams from around the world by driving a car, walking over debris, cutting a hole in a wall, turning a valve for a fire hose and performing other tasks — all with spotty communications between man and machine. The course simulated a disaster area in which humans could not safely operate.

“I am incredibly proud of our robotics team,” said IHMC CEO/Director Ken Ford. “They did a amazing job finishing second overall and were first among the Atlas teams.”

The competition, the third and final trial since 2013, was sponsored by DARPA, the Defense Advance Research Projects Agency. The first-place team, Team KAIST from South Korea, was awarded $2 million. It also completed all eight tasks, but did so six minutes faster than the IHMC robot. IHMC, which finished the course in just over 50 minutes Saturday, will bring home $1 million in prize money. A chimp-like robot from Carnegie Mellon University placed third. Only three teams completed all eight tasks.

Unlike some of the other robots, which moved on wheels or four legs, IHMC’s machine and the other Atlas robots had to balance and walk on two legs. After it fell twice Friday in its first run through the course, IHMC’s 23-member team worked through the night to resolve the problems and replace part of an arm and a leg.

“It was pretty damaged after Friday’s falls, so we had to take it slow today,” said IHMC computer scientist and team member Doug Stephen. “Part of the physical structure was bent, so it was throwing off some of the alignment. So we didn’t think we’d get even two tasks done today, much less all eight.”

“Everyone is over the moon now,” Stephen said. “We’re super-happy.”

Organizers of the much-anticipated event said the advances made by IHMC and other teams mark the start of a new era in the science of robotics.

Humans “get most of our ideas about robotics from science fiction. (Today) we want to show a little bit of science fact,” Gill Pratt, director of the event, told the Associated Press.

While Hollywood has portrayed robots as agile and self-thinking, the machines are only now beginning to make strides toward that ideal, and the competition was designed to push the research forward, organizers said.

The 6-foot, 2-inch Atlas robot used by IHMC, which weighs more than 380 pounds, was built by Boston Dynamics. But the software and controls were produced by institute researchers Jerry Pratt, John Carff, Peter Neuhaus, Matt Johnson and others. After the second round of the robotics challenge in late 2013, that software was considered so robust that DARPA asked that other teams be allowed to use it.

“Some of the other teams’ software would just let them say, ‘move here,'” said Carff, who was the primary operator of the robot. “With ours, we could put a virtual arm out in the world, and we can see where that virtual arm is going to go, we can preview the path it’s going to take, and we can say, ‘Yes, that’s not going to collide with anything, so go for it.'”

In keeping with IHMC’s core principles, the software ensures a high degree of collaboration between the human operators and the machine by “providing bi-directional information exchange,” according to an academic paper authored by the team members. The robot may suggest a move, but that suggestion can be verified by human operators.

The challenge has been a great learning experience for IHMC’s team and the entire field of robotics, team members said.

“All we can do is do the best research we can do,” Stephen said. “It’s not about beating the other teams as it is advancing the research and sharing that with the world.”

IHMC team members are expected to take some much-needed time off this summer before turning to other robotics projects.

Posted
AuthorBrooke Layton

Now that the IHMC open source initiative is underway and we’ve started to receive some feedback, we feel that it’s a good time to start providing a little bit more information about our goals, roadmap, and intent. The open source initiative orbits around two key components: Simulation Construction Set (SCS) and our whole-body control algorithm for walking and manipulation. We realize that it may have been confusing for our existing alpha testers as to what we mean by “open source” since many of our components were provided to testers as binaries; this initiative is not just about providing an open source wrapper, but about open sourcing the underlying code itself. As we work towards this goal, we want to talk about our intent and ideas for where these pieces of software are going and how this will impact people who choose to use them, and how this may impact any DRC team that chooses to adopt our software.

Simulation Construction Set

SCS is, at its core, a cross-platform simulation and analysis environment developed in Java and designed from the ground up with walking in mind. Due to this, there are some aspects of SCS that cause it to differ from Gazebo; we feel that the underlying physics engine and architecture lends itself to walking with much less parameter fiddling and tuning out of the box. But unlike Gazebo, the contact and collision modelling does not readily accommodate high-fidelity simulation of grasping and manipulation. We plan to rectify this in the near term with a ground up revamp of how collisions are detected and resolved. This includes not only improved contact modeling, but support for simulating grippers (which can be computationally complex). This will be available early enough to use before the finals (since we need this functionality too), but it is not available out of the box right now. Additionally, unlike Gazebo, SCS is developed as more of a library or SDK for creating simulations than it is a stand-alone simulator in which to design environments and scenarios independently; SCS simulations are programs rather than descriptions and models. Combined with our use of Java and its lack of a static compilation step, this has served us extremely well internally in allowing for very rapid prototyping. But we realize that this is not attractive to a lot of people; some people need the physics and contact modeling that Gazebo provides, some people don’t want to switch away from Gazebo, some people don’t want to make the switch to Java as a programming environment, and for anybody with an existing Gazebo-based workflow this is a huge shift whether the desire to switch is there or not. For this reason, we are also providing a version of the Atlas robot model as distributed in the drcsim package from OSRF that replaces the ROS plugin with an IHMC plugin. Our plugin provides a bridge from our controller in to Gazebo. We plan to work with OSRF to have this model distributed as part of future drcsim releases alongside the other versions of the Atlas model.

IHMC Whole Body Controller

The chunk of the open source release perhaps of most interest to a lot of people would be the controller. We have received a great deal of questions about our controller and what we plan to offer, so in that frame let us clarify what we are and are not planning on doing at a high-level with our controller.

The first thing that we want to mention is that our intent with this open source release is not to strictly target Atlas or the DARPA Robotics Challenge; this is the easiest audience to target today, but our goal is to provide a long-term, open-source, publicly available solution for controlling walking robots to any academic, hobbyist, etc. organization that would like to use a walking robot platform but maybe have issues with a lack of time/interest/resources to tackle the challenging walking problem. This is probably our most important and driving concern: making it easier for researchers and developers who are not experts in bipedal locomotion to get humanoid robots to do real tasks. This goal will be informing a lot of our decisions in regards to what features we implement, how our API looks, and where to best allocate our resources. So while many people will have many requests for many things, at the end of the day it will be up to us whether or not implementing something that makes the DRC easier or integration with a team’s DRC stack more streamlined is also beneficial to walking robotics as a whole.

Perhaps the question we’ve received most frequently from our testers, who are Atlas teams, is “what does our controller offer that Boston Dynamics doesn’t?” This is actually a fairly difficult question to answer, because as Atlas teams none of us really know how the Boston Dynamics controller works due to its black-box nature and lack of accompanying publications describing their algorithms. That said there’s no question that for our control software to be considered useful to other Atlas teams it has to provide a value add over the existing solution that makes the opportunity cost of converting any existing software that uses the Boston Dynamics API worthwhile. Out of the box, our initial value proposition is:

  1. An open-source, documented, and published algorithm that teams are free to modify, study, and otherwise dig through to their hearts content. The open-source release will encompass not just our source code but also a public forum, public bug tracker, and publicly viewable continuous integration server to keep other teams abreast of the status of the software and should deliver a reasonable amount of confidence in regards to whether or not a new release will “break” anything.

  2. Out of the box support for whole body control. No switching of modes necessary, and no issues moving the upper body or carrying small tools while walking.

In regards to the quality of the walking algorithm, we can’t really provide any more sense of confidence than what we’ve already provided; the algorithm we will distribute to the teams will be the exact same algorithm that led us to 1st place in the Virtual Robotics Challenge and 2nd place in the DARPA Robotics Challenge trials; any improvements we make to the algorithm will make it out to the public and other teams will reap its benefits alongside of us. The algorithm that IHMC will be using at the Finals will be the same as the one that is released to the other Atlas teams. Some of the more quantifiable improvements over the Boston Dynamics software include a more robust framework for dealing with increased forces/torques at the hands/wrists (such as when providing contact with the outside world e.g. climbing a ladder or when lifting up a tool) and faster walking among other things.

We know that most teams have no intent of switching to Java. Therefore, the "high level" API will be a ROS-based API that will closely mimic our internal API. For the Atlas teams, we are actively investigating the ability to switch between our controller and the Boston Dynamics control API on the fly. We are also in the process of establishing 1KHz pass-through for the control data from the Atlas robot when running our controller. As time goes on, the API will grow to accommodate new features. As to what features this will include, we obviously don’t know yet, but at a high level we do have an idea of what teams can expect soon. We have been working with some third-party software and can start to promise a few new tricks that are absent from the existing Boston Dynamics tools that will be on the near-term roadmap. Through the help of some friends at the ETH Zurich Autonomous Systems Lab, we have added an API for externally communicating localization information to our controller and have tested it with their fantastic iterative closest point based localization and mapping software. The ETH software is also open source and we are looking for ways to provide this to the teams. You can see a video of the impact that this localization has on our walking in this video. We also plan to add API support for other high level external tools like footstep planning based on heightmap data so that teams can integrate their existing software more easily.

We will be working diligently on the algorithm in simulation with the new Atlas models in the coming weeks while the robots are being upgraded so that we can get up and running with the new robots as soon as they get back. With this in mind, please keep an eye on our BitBucket repos for the source code releases of SCS and the control algorithm, and submit any feature requests, API changes, bug reports, etc. We have also launched a simple forum at https://discuss-robots.ihmc.us for users of our software; probably won't be much activity there right now, but we hope to see the community grow in the future.

Hopefully this clears up a lot of the lingering questions about what we intend to provide, and if you have any further inquiries feel free to reach out to us.

Sincerely,

IHMC Robotics Open Source Software Team

Posted
AuthorDoug Stephen
5 CommentsPost a comment

Simulation Construction Set

At the IHMC Robot Lab, we believe in providing open access to resources and knowledge that we have developed to our fellow researchers, scientists, engineers, and hobbyists in an effort to advance the field of robotics. It is in this spirit that we are excited to announce that beginning today we will be undertaking a massive and ongoing software development effort to provide access to many of our software tools and control algorithms under open source licenses.

This will be a large undertaking; at last review our codebase is comprised of more than 1.2 million lines of Java source code built up from well over a decade of research and engineering effort. Cleaning up and preparing this codebase for public consumption will be no small feat, so we don’t plan to release everything all at once. We’ve already produced our first small stand-alone open source library, the library we use for soft real-time computation using Java on Linux called IHMCRealtime, which you can find at our organizational BitBucket page at https://bitbucket.org/ihmcrobotics. The next target for open sourcing will be providing access to our cross-platform, in-house simulation library known as Simulation Construction Set (SCS), which we use to develop, simulate, and analyze our control engineering efforts for all of our robots. We plan on having our first open-source “alpha” release of SCS available to the public at the end of Fall 2014, with a developer interface in place to allow for the simulation of homegrown control algorithms. As time goes on we will also be providing open source access to a variety of other development tools.

We will also be open sourcing the software developed as a result of our walking and controls research, including the software we use to power the Boston Dynamics Atlas robot for the DARPA Robotics Challenge (DRC). It is our hope for the future that by providing an easy to use SDK for interfacing with legged robots, we will make it easy for anybody that would normally avoid these platforms due to the complexity of walking and balance to bring their insights and expertise to our field with a much lower barrier to entry.

We’re excited to be undertaking this effort, and if you wish to follow our progress you can follow our lab blog at http://robots.ihmc.us/blog, our BitBucket account at https://bitbucket.org/ihmcrobotics, and our lab’s Twitter account @IHMCRobotics.

Posted
AuthorDoug Stephen

The Institute for Human and Machine Cognition (IHMC) in sunny Pensacola, Florida is looking to hire new team members for its DARPA Robotics Challenge and Robotic Exoskeleton teams.

Team IHMC was the second place finisher in the DARPA Robotics Challenge Trials, held in December 2014.  We are now working on the final phase of the DRC, which involves getting the Boston Dynamics Atlas humanoid robot to perform a series of real world challenges in a disaster response scenario. We are looking to hire several talented, motivated, and competitive individuals for a variety of engineering positions to help IHMC continue its success in this program. Long term, short term, post-doc, and internship positions are all available.

Starting Date: As soon as possible.

Location: Institute for Human and Machine Cognition (IHMC), Pensacola, FL

Application Deadline: Open until filled.

 

Specific positions include:

Humanoid manipulation expert. Ideal candidate is an expert in robot manipulation who has experience with real robot hardware. The DARPA Robotics Challenge requires tackling several interesting manipulation problems, including picking debris off the ground, turning valves, using tools, and driving a vehicle.

Robot localization expert. Ideal candidate has extensive experience developing and implementing robot localization algorithms, which use Lidar sensors. The next phase of the DRC will have long periods of communication drop outs, meaning the robot must be able to continue operating without human involvement. A key necessity then becomes good localization.

DevOps engineer. Ideal candidate has extensive experience with continuous integration and continuous delivery of Java software. We are always improving our continuous integration pipeline and are looking for someone with the experience and passion to take our software delivery to the next level. We use various build automation tools including Gradle and most of the Atlassian tools including Bamboo, Clover, Jira, FishEye, and Stash.

Humanoid walking and whole body motion control algorithm expert. Ideal candidate will have significant experience developing and implementing algorithms for whole body motion control of legged robots. In this phase of the DRC, it will be important to perform whole body tasks, such as climbing a ladder and getting out of a vehicle.

Software testing expert. Ideal candidate has extensive experience with JUnit unit testing, continuous build servers, and other Java testing and development tools. Team IHMC is test obsessed and is looking for someone who is just plain test insane.

Robot control algorithm software developer. Ideal candidate has extensive experience developing and implementing various algorithms for controlling robots, with as strong background in robot kinematics, dynamics, and control theory.

Internships. Internships are available for students that are currently pursuing an undergraduate or graduate degree in engineering, and looking to take some time off from classes, or time off between degrees to work on an exciting project. We require that interns spend a minimum of 4 months at IHMC, but longer term, e.g. 6 to 9 months, internships are preferable.

 

For all positions, ideal candidate should have the ability to write clean code in Java to the highest standards, have an understanding of advanced object-oriented programming concepts, and have excellent analytical, problem solving and organizational skills. Applicants must have excellent communication and documentation skills, be self-motivated and function with little micro-management, thriving in both a team and individual environment.

To Apply:  Complete the intense, timed, Java challenge at Interview Street by going to the following link:

http://istest.co/ihmcdrcsummer2014

 Please note that the Java programming challenge is difficult and has a time limit of 16 hours to complete it. The challenge contains some straightforward robotics problems, as well as some more complex programming challenges. The challenge cannot be paused, so only begin it when you are ready and have allotted adequate time and brainpower to complete the challenge. In addition, you will be asked to upload your resume to the site during the challenge.

Your score on the Java programming challenge will be factored into your application and is required to apply for this position. Team IHMC develops almost exclusively in Java and therefore new team members must be effective Java programmers. If you are proficient in other programming languages and wish to learn Java, we recommend reading “Thinking in Java” by Bruce Eckel, and installing the Eclipse IDE to quickly get up and running. If you want to practice on programming similar programming challenges, before trying the IHMC challenge, we suggest getting an account at HackerRank and trying out some of their warmup challenges at https://www.hackerrank.com/categories/algorithms/warmup

Updates to this announcement may appear at http://www.ihmc.us/robotjobs.

Information about IHMC’s DRC Team: http://robots.ihmc.us/drc/

Questions: robotjobs@ihmc.us

This job posting will be active until January 1, 2015, or until all available positions are filled.

IHMC is an AA/EEO Employer.

Posted
AuthorBrooke Layton
2 CommentsPost a comment

We are celebrating the 5th annual National Robotics Week by opening the Robotics Lab to the public for tours and demonstrations. The goal is to educate and inspire students in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. This free, family-friendly event encourages scientific discovery through hands-on activities challenges and demonstrations while providing the opportunity to learn about scientific careers from actual research scientists and science educators. Robots on display will include Boston Dynamics' Atlas robot used in the DARPA Robotics Challenge, the FastRunner and HexRunner prototypes, micro air vehicles, and NASA's X1 Exoskeleton.

Come join us on April 10th from 4-7pm!

Posted
AuthorBrooke Layton

We are looking for a few good interns for our DARPA Robotics Challenge team for Summer 2014. Our lab is built on clever interns from around the world who are creative, take initiative, and work well in an open team environment. If you're up for the challenge, info on how to apply is below. If you're not up for the challenge but know someone who is, feel free to share!

 

IHMC Robotics  - DARPA Robotics Challenge Summer 2014 Internships

The Institute for Human and Machine Cognition (IHMC) in sunny Pensacola, Florida is looking to hire new team members for its DARPA Robotics Challenge team. Team IHMC was the second place finisher in DARPA’s Robotics Challenge Trials, held in December, 2013.  We are now in the Final phase of the DRC, which involves improving the performance of the Boston Dynamics Atlas humanoid robot in the series of real world challenges in a disaster response scenario. We are looking to hire several talented, motivated, and competitive individuals for a variety of engineering positions to help IHMC continue its success in this program.


Starting Date: Summer, 2014
Location: Institute for Human and Machine Cognition (IHMC), Pensacola, FL
Application Deadline: Open until filled.


Internships are available for students that are currently pursuing an undergraduate or graduate degree in engineering, and looking to take some time off from classes, or time off between degrees to work on an exciting project. Ideal candidate should have the ability to write clean code in Java to the highest standards, have an understanding of advanced level object-oriented programming concepts, and have excellent analytical, problem solving and organizational skills. Applicants should have knowledge of standard control theory, robot kinematics, dynamics, and control concepts. Applicants must have excellent communication and documentation skills, thriving in both a team and individual environment.
 
To Apply:  Complete the intense, timed, Java challenge at Interview Street by going to the following link:
http://istest.co/ihmcdrcsummer2014
 
Please note that the Java programming challenge is difficult and you will be given up to 16 hours to complete it. The challenge contains some straightforward robotics problems, as well as some more complex programming challenges. The test cannot be paused, so only begin the test when you are ready and have allotted adequate time and brainpower to complete the challenge.
 
Your score on the Java programming challenge will be factored into your application and is required to apply for this position. Team IHMC develops almost exclusively in Java and therefore new team members must be effective Java programmers. If you are proficient in other programming languages and wish to learn Java, we recommend reading “Thinking in Java” by Bruce Eckel, and installing the Eclipse IDE to quickly get up and running.
 
Updates to this announcement may appear at http://www.ihmc.us/robotjobs.
 
Information about IHMC’s DRC Team: http://robots.ihmc.us/drc/
Questions: robotjobs@ihmc.us

This job posting will be active until March 30, 2014.
IHMC is an AA/EEO Employer.

Posted
AuthorBrooke Layton

Where to start? 2013 was a crazy year for us. I wish we'd decided to start writing here sooner so we could share more of it with you. Fitting enough that the event in Homestead happened in December, to cap off the year. The thrill of our finish in the virtual challenge, the sights and sounds of the first time we powered up Atlas, and the long, long road we walked to get to Homestead was full of tons of ups and downs. And then there was the DRC Trials themselves. It was intense.

We're excited to even have had the opportunity to take part in the DARPA Robotics Challenge; and even more so, we're excited to have the opportunity to share our research and what we're capable of with the world. Finishing in 2nd place at Homestead was a pretty awesome moment for us, and we're in good company with lots of other super talented folks like Google/SCHAFT, CMU's Tartan Rescue, NASA JPL's RoboSimian, plus the four(!!) other Atlas robots that pushed through to the finals from MIT, TRACLabs, WPI, and Lockheed.

It's February now, and most of us have been out of the lab since the Trials ended. We were pulling some insane hours leading up to the Trials, and both ourselves and our Atlas needed a vacation. We're kicking off our run up to the finals this week, and starting to get back in to the swing of things. We look forward to putting on another great show at the Finals, and we'll be doing our best to share more with you here on our blog (look for posts from tons of different folks in the lab, sharing research and insight in to the world of humanoid robots) as well as over on Twitter this year as we move towards the $2 million prize.

One last thing before I sign off and get back to work; I wanna take some time out to thank some of the people involved with the DRC and with our team that made all of this possible. A short word from our sponsors, if you will.

Atlassian

We'd like to thank Atlassian for not just making killer tools to help us manage the complexity of our project and our rotating cast of a team, but donating the time of their engineer Tim Pettersen to help us not just learn all the ins and outs of their software but also contributing a ton to our simulation software and the team's success as a whole. The evolution of our relationship from sponsor to partner and the collaboration between our organizations has been a real eye-opening experience that has helped drive us towards excellence. We look forward to continuing to work with Atlassian and having them involved with our DRC team over the course of the next stretch.

Pennington PA

Thanks, Pennington Law!

Wiley Horton and Pennington PA were kind enough to donate to the DRC Team so that we could post up with a beautiful, cozy RV on-site at Homestead, functioning as our team's Hospitality Suite. The DRC was just as much stress as it was fun and challenging; having simple creature comforts like AC and a place to rest during byes helped keep us fresh, alert, and happy in the face of some truly tremendous competition, and it wouldn't have been possible without contributions from Wiley and Pennington PA. The crazy South Florida sunshine and 80+ degree heat were almost as much of an adversary as the other teams, so having the RV around was huge.

Ryan McKenzie and The Clough Foundation

We want to thank The Clough Foundation for their continuing support of open access and transparency in the robotics community over the years by helping us in our endeavor to document our efforts and produce high quality video footage for the public. We're firm believers in collaboration and dissemination in the sciences, and our media team's obsessive recording of every single moment that the robot was powered on (literally!) has enabled us not only in this end but in analyzing every fall, trip, and slip that Atlas made over the past few months to push our development to the level it needed to be at. It has also enabled us to process and produce the videos that populate and will continue to populate our YouTube Accounts (here and here).

Boston Dynamics

We want to thank the folks at Boston Dynamics for their role in the DARPA Robotics Challenge. The Atlas platform is a remarkable feat in hardware engineering, providing an unparalleled level of reliability in a humanoid platform that is robust to damage and ready to be run hard right out of the box. Their software and hardware support teams have been fantastically responsive to every little scare and bug report that has cropped up, and we were always met with friendliness and engineering excellence. We want to wish the entire Atlas support team all of the best at their new home with Google, and we look forward to seeing what they crank out for the final leg next year.

The Open Source Robotics Foundation

None of the DRC would have been possible for the Track B teams if The Open Source Robotics Foundation hadn't been brought in to support the development of their fantastic and free software stacks that enable an entirely new breed of simulation and robotics development. ROS and Gazebo have the potential to completely revolutionize the way that robotics research is conducted, especially for small teams with limited access to resources that need to get bootstrapped quickly. The role of the OSRF in lowering the barrier to entry for to robotics research is going to be huge and we look forward to seeing what they continue to do.

DARPA

Last but not least, we would like to thank DARPA and the team that have been working tirelessly on the Virtual Challenge, DRC Trials, and upcoming Finals. The event itself in Homestead far exceeded anything that we could have expected; it was well organized and once the headaches were ironed out during the dress rehearsals the whole thing went off without a hitch. They publicized and drew a healthy crowd and plenty of media; the DARPA folks were able to bring both fun and a major amount of mainstream credibility to a field that can frequently be shrouded in obscurity, all while maintaining an exceptional level of organization and professionalism. The DRC is enabling huge leaps forward in the field of humanoids, and we want to thank DARPA for not only putting on such an awesome event but allowing us to be a part of it.

So with that said, here's an awesome 2014 and a great show at the Finals!

Posted
AuthorDoug Stephen

It's been a long road to get here, but the time has come and we couldn't be more excited: The 2013 DARPA Robotics Challenge Trials in Homestead, FL are upon us.

There have been a lot long nights, pizza deliveries, and industrial strength jet fuel coffee to get us here, but we're feeling super prepared and super excited to be joining up with such an awesome group of fellow roboticists at the DRC Trials this weekend.

We'll leave you with a sneak peek at what our Atlas is capable of, and our official press release. Hope to see you in Homestead!

IHMC Robotics Team Ready for DARPA Competition

 

Posted
AuthorDoug Stephen
1472969_623533907683605_995451225_n.jpg

Our team has been packing all night for our trip to Miami! Atlas was picked up this morning by FedEx White Glove service and they should (hopefully) take good care of him. Pizza Packing Party today for the rest of us. We've got a huge moving truck and five minivans for our Mega Miami Migration. We've been stuffing them full of computers, extension cords, battery backups, and enough coffee to last us a few months... even though we will only be there for a week. We love our french roast! The drive should take us about 10 hours, longer if we see some sites.

Looking forward to the DARPA Robotics Challenge Trials next week! Wish us luck!

Posted
AuthorBrooke Layton